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Tob Control. 2019 Jun 5. pii: tobaccocontrol-2018-054764. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2018-054764. [Epub ahead of print]

Impact of e-cigarette and cigarette prices on youth and young adult e-cigarette and cigarette behaviour: evidence from a national longitudinal cohort.

Author information

1
Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York City, New York, USA jennifer.cantrell@nyu.edu.
2
Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Department of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, New York City, New York, USA.
4
Schroeder Institute, Truth Initiative, New York City, New York, USA.
5
Schroeder Institute, Truth Initiative, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
6
Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York City, New York, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Understanding the impact of prices for tobacco and nicotine products is critical for creating policies to prevent use among young people. This study examines the impact of electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) and cigarette prices on current e-cigarette and cigarette use among youth and young adults.

METHODS:

Data were from a national probability-based sample aged 15-21 collected in 2014 and followed every 6 months for 2.5 years through 2016. We conducted separate conditional likelihood logistic regression models with past 30-day e-cigarette use and past 30-day cigarette use outcomes on the sample of individuals who participated in at least two survey waves (n=11 578) with linked Nielsen market-level price data for rechargeable e-cigarettes and cigarettes. Models controlled for time-varying variables at the individual and state policy levels, and fixed effects at the individual, wave and market levels.

RESULTS:

Higher cigarette prices were associated with increased past 30-day e-cigarette use, indicating e-cigarettes may serve as a substitute for cigarettes. We did not find a statistically significant relationship between rechargeable e-cigarette prices and past 30-day e-cigarette use; neither did we find a significant relationship between rechargeable e-cigarette prices and past 30-day cigarette smoking.

CONCLUSION:

This is the first study to examine e-cigarette and cigarette prices on e-cigarette and cigarette behaviour longitudinally among young people. Findings suggest the need for better measuring the costs associated with e-cigarette use among this population, as well as a careful assessment of price and tax policies that takes into account cross-product impact to sufficiently discourage e-cigarette and cigarette use among young people.

KEYWORDS:

electronic nicotine delivery devices; non-cigarette tobacco products; price; public policy; taxation

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: None declared.

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