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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2019 Aug;43(8):1727-1733. doi: 10.1111/acer.14121. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Association Analysis: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Hypertension Status in Children and Adolescents.

Author information

1
Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia.
2
Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined the relationship between prenatal exposure to alcohol, manifested through fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and pFAS, and hypertension in children and adolescents.

METHODS:

This study was designed to analyze the association between fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) Status and hypertension status. FAS/pFAS-diagnosed respondents (n = 125) were collected from a FASD Clinical database in Atlanta, Georgia. Non-FAS/pFAS respondents (n = 500) were taken from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Chi-square analyses were used to examine the extent to which FASD status, sex, race/ethnicity, medication use, and obesity status each related to hypertension status. A logistic regression was performed analyzing the relationship between FASD status (y/n: independent) and hypertension status (y/n: dependent) while controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, medication use, and obesity status.

RESULTS:

Univariate relationships between hypertension status and FASD status (OR = 8.46, p < 0.001), medication use (OR = 3.25, p < 0.001), and obesity status (OR = 3.03, p = 0.02) proved to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). FASD status significantly predicted hypertension status (β = 2.31, OR = 10.06, p < 0.001) after accounting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, medication use, and obesity status.

CONCLUSIONS:

The major findings of this study suggest a significant relationship between FASD and hypertension in youth. Race/ethnicity and obesity also proved important in predicting hypertensive blood pressure readings independent of FASD diagnosis. Further research is needed to isolate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) as a factor promoting increased hypertension and to assess the risk for hypertension in alcohol-affected adults.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Children; Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders; Hypertension; Prenatal Exposure

PMID:
31166027
DOI:
10.1111/acer.14121

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