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Acta Diabetol. 2019 Jun 4. doi: 10.1007/s00592-019-01371-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Physical workload and glycemia changes during football matches in adolescents with type 1 diabetes can be comparable.

Author information

1
Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Diabetology, Endocrinology and Nephrology, Medical University of Lodz, ul. Sporna 36/50, 91-738, Lodz, Poland. arkadiusz.michalak.lek@gmail.com.
3
The Academic Laboratory of Movement and Human Physical Performance DynamoLab, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Oncology and Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Diabetology, Endocrinology and Nephrology, Medical University of Lodz, ul. Sporna 36/50, 91-738, Lodz, Poland.

Abstract

AIMS:

To analyze physical performance and diabetes-related outcomes in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) during two semi-competitive football matches utilising precise physical activity monitoring.

METHODS:

The study was conducted during an annual summer camp for adolescents with T1DM. After physical examination and glycated hemoglobin measurement, 16 adolescent players completed Cooper's 12-min running test and, in the following days, took part in two football matches while wearing heart rate (HR) monitors coupled with global positioning system (GPS) tracking.

RESULTS:

Both matches were comparable in terms of covered distances, number of sprints, achieved velocities and heart rate responses. During both games, capillary blood lactate increased significantly (Match 1: 1.75 ± 0.16-6.13 ± 1.73 mmol/l; Match 2: 1.77 ± 0.18-3.91 ± 0.63 mmol/l, p = 0.004). No significant differences in blood glucose were observed between the matches (p = 0.83) or over each match (p = 0.78). Clinically significant hypoglycemia (< 54 mg/dl) occurred in two children during the first match. None of the players experienced severe hypoglycemia. Despite similar workloads, players consumed significantly less carbohydrates during Match 2 [median difference: - 20 g (25-75%: - 40 to 0), p = 0.006].

CONCLUSIONS:

HR monitoring and GPS-based tracking can effectively parameterize physical activity during a football match. In T1DM patients, exercise workload and glycemic changes during similar matches are comparable, which provides an opportunity to develop individual recommendations for players with T1DM.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Football; GPS tracking; HR monitoring; Type 1 diabetes

PMID:
31165264
DOI:
10.1007/s00592-019-01371-0

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