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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2019 Aug;119(8):1725-1733. doi: 10.1007/s00421-019-04162-1. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Acute effects of very low-volume high-intensity interval training on muscular fatigue and serum testosterone level vary according to age and training status.

Author information

1
Institute of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania.
2
Institute of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania. rau.kru@stud.lsu.lt.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the acute physiological responses of three different very low-volume cycling sessions (6 × 5 s, 3 × 30 s, and 3 × 60 s) and their dependence on age and training status.

METHODS:

Subjects were untrained young men (mean ± SD; age 22.3 ± 4.6 years, VO2peak 42.4 ± 5.5 ml/kg/min, n = 10), older untrained men (69.9 ± 6.3 years, 26.5 ± 7.6 ml/kg/min, n = 11), and endurance-trained cyclists (26.4 ± 9.4 years, 55.4 ± 6.6 ml/kg/min, n = 10). Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and electrically stimulated knee extension torque, and low-frequency fatigue, as ratio of stimulation torques at 20-100 Hz (P20/100), were measured only 24 h after exercise. Serum testosterone (Te) and blood lactate concentrations were measured only 1 h after exercise.

RESULTS:

All protocols increased the blood lactate concentration and decreased MVC and P20/100 in young men, but especially young untrained men. In old untrained men, 6 × 5 s decreased P20/100 but not MVC. Te increased after 3 × 30 s and 3 × 60 s in young untrained men and after 3 × 60 s in older untrained men. The increase in Te correlated with responses of blood lactate concentration, MVC, and P20/100 only in old untrained men.

CONCLUSIONS:

As little as 6 × 5 s all-out cycling induced fatigue in young and old untrained and endurance-trained cyclists. Slightly higher-volume sessions with longer intervals, however, suppressed contractile function more markedly and also transiently increased serum testosterone concentration in untrained men.

KEYWORDS:

Anabolic response; High-intensity interval training; Low-frequency fatigue; Sprint interval training

PMID:
31165241
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-019-04162-1

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