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HNO. 2019 Sep;67(9):679-684. doi: 10.1007/s00106-019-0678-7.

Polysomnography and sleep position, a Heisenberg phenomenon? : A large-scale series.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck surgery, OLVG, location West, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061 AE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. p.e.vonk@olvg.nl.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck surgery, OLVG, location West, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061 AE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Oral Kinesiology, ACTA, MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital (UZA), Antwerp, Belgium.
5
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck surgery, Medical Centre Jan van Goyen, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The severity of position-dependent obstructive sleep apnea (POSA) depends on the nonsupine and supine apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) as well as the time spent in supine position. The latter in particular is susceptible to variation. Several small-scale studies suggest that wearing polysomnography (PSG) apparatus leads to an increase in supine sleeping position.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of wearing PSG apparatus on sleeping position and on OSA severity.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A large-scale, retrospective study was performed, including a consecutive series of POSA and non-apneic snoring patients who were prescribed positional therapy (Sleep Position Trainer [SPT]). The effect of wearing PSG apparatus on sleeping position was evaluated by comparing body position during the PSG night and inactive (diagnostic) phase of SPT.

RESULTS:

The mean percentage of total recording time (TRT) in supine position was 43.1% during the PSG night phase compared with 28.6% of TRT during the inactive (diagnostic) phase of SPT; i.e., a significant decrease of 33.6% (p < 0.001). When adjusting the AHI using TRT in different sleeping positions measured with the SPT, the median AHI decreased from 13.3/h (9.0-20.4) to 10.3/h (6.8-16.2); p < 0.001. When using the adjusted AHI, 33% (N = 66) of all patients had a change in OSA severity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study indicate that wearing PSG apparatus leads to an increase in the percentage of supine sleeping position causing an overestimation of OSA severity, especially in patients with POSA. This can have significant impact on both clinical and scientific practice.

KEYWORDS:

Severity; Sleep apnea, obstructive; Sleep wake disorders; Snoring; Supine position

PMID:
31165199
DOI:
10.1007/s00106-019-0678-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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