Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Mol Sci. 2019 Jun 3;20(11). pii: E2720. doi: 10.3390/ijms20112720.

Animal Models for Human Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Focused on the Use of Indirect Hormonal Perturbations: A Review of the Literature.

Ryu Y1, Kim SW2, Kim YY3,4, Ku SY5,6.

Author information

1
Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea. dragonkai@naver.com.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea. byulbi81@snu.ac.kr.
3
Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea. yoonykim@snu.ac.kr.
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea. yoonykim@snu.ac.kr.
5
Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea. jyhsyk@snu.ac.kr.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea. jyhsyk@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Hormonal disturbances, such as hyperandrogenism, are considered important for developing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in humans. Accordingly, directly hormone-regulated animal models are widely used for studying PCOS, as they replicate several key PCOS features. However, the pathogenesis and treatment of PCOS are still unclear. In this review, we aimed to investigate animal PCOS models and PCOS-like phenotypes in animal experiments without direct hormonal interventions and determine the underlying mechanisms for a better understanding of PCOS. We summarized animal PCOS models that used indirect hormonal interventions and suggested or discussed pathogenesis of PCOS-like features in animals and PCOS-like phenotypes generated in other animals. We presented integrated physiological insights and shared cellular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of PCOS in reviewed animal models. Our review indicates that the hormonal and metabolic changes could be due to molecular dysregulations, such as upregulated PI3K-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling, that potentially cause PCOS-like phenotypes in the animal models. This review will be helpful for considering alternative animal PCOS models to determine the cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying PCOS symptoms. The efforts to determine the specific cellular mechanisms of PCOS will contribute to novel treatments and control methods for this complex syndrome.

KEYWORDS:

animal models; ovary; pathogenesis; polycystic ovary syndrome

PMID:
31163591
PMCID:
PMC6600358
DOI:
10.3390/ijms20112720
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center