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Lancet Oncol. 2019 Jun;20(6):e302-e312. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(19)30309-2.

International myeloma working group consensus recommendations on imaging in monoclonal plasma cell disorders.

Author information

1
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, USA. Electronic address: jens.hillengass@roswellpark.org.
2
Levine Cancer Institute/Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC, USA.
3
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine and Division of Hematopathology, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
4
Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
Institute of Cancer Molecular and Cellular Biology, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
6
Emory University Medical School, Atlanta, GA, USA.
7
Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.
8
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Hematology, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
10
Department of Hematology, Hospital de Clinicas, Montevideo, Uruguay.
11
Department of Hematology, Changzhen Hospital, Shanghai, China.
12
VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
13
Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, TN, USA.
14
Department of Clinical Therapeutics, University of Athens School of Medicine, Athens, Greece.
15
University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
16
Department of Laboratory Medecine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
17
Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, CIMA, Pamplona, Spain.
18
University Hospital Heidelberg, National Center for Tumor diseases Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
19
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
20
Department of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
21
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
22
Department of Medicine I, Wilhelminenspital Der Stadt Wien, Vienna, Austria.
23
Department of Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.
24
Universitätsklinik Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany.
25
Oslo Myeloma Center, Oslo University Hospital; KG Jebsen Center for B Cell Malignancies, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
26
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing, China.
27
Department of Hematology, Syddansk Universitet, Odense, Denmark.
28
Departments of Medicine and Hematology and Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
29
Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland.
30
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
31
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, Metabolism, Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine and Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
32
Department of Hematology, Grupo Español di Mieloma, Hospital Universitario, Madrid, Spain.
33
Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Erratum in

Abstract

Recent advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma have increased the need for accurate diagnosis of the disease. The detection of bone and bone marrow lesions is crucial in the investigation of multiple myeloma and often dictates the decision to start treatment. Furthermore, detection of minimal residual disease is important for prognosis determination and treatment planning, and it has underscored an unmet need for sensitive imaging methods that accurately assess patient response to multiple myeloma treatment. Low-dose whole-body CT has increased sensitivity compared with conventional skeletal survey in the detection of bone disease, which can reveal information leading to changes in therapy and disease management that could prevent or delay the onset of clinically significant morbidity and mortality as a result of skeletal-related events. Given the multiple options available for the detection of bone and bone marrow lesions, ranging from conventional skeletal survey to whole-body CT, PET/CT, and MRI, the International Myeloma Working Group decided to establish guidelines on optimal use of imaging methods at different disease stages. These recommendations on imaging within and outside of clinical trials will help standardise imaging for monoclonal plasma cell disorders worldwide to allow the comparison of results and the unification of treatment approaches for multiple myeloma.

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