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Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2019 Jun 4;21(7):49. doi: 10.1007/s11920-019-1043-y.

Smartphone-Based Tracking of Sleep in Depression, Anxiety, and Psychotic Disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 22, Välskärinkatu 12 A, FI-00014, Helsinki, Finland. talayeh.aledavood@aalto.fi.
2
Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland. talayeh.aledavood@aalto.fi.
3
Division of Digital Psychiatry Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Computer Science, Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
6
Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Sleep is an important feature in mental illness. Smartphones can be used to assess and monitor sleep, yet there is little prior application of this approach in depressive, anxiety, or psychotic disorders. We review uses of smartphones and wearable devices for sleep research in patients with these conditions.

RECENT FINDINGS:

To date, most studies consist of pilot evaluations demonstrating feasibility and acceptability of monitoring sleep using smartphones and wearable devices among individuals with psychiatric disorders. Promising findings show early associations between behaviors and sleep parameters and agreement between clinic-based assessments, active smartphone data capture, and passively collected data. Few studies report improvement in sleep or mental health outcomes. Success of smartphone-based sleep assessments and interventions requires emphasis on promoting long-term adherence, exploring possibilities of adaptive and personalized systems to predict risk/relapse, and determining impact of sleep monitoring on improving patients' quality of life and clinically meaningful outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Circadian rhythms; Mental illness; Psychotic disorders; Sleep; Smartphones; Wearable

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