Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Affect Disord. 2019 May 28;256:62-69. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2019.05.071. [Epub ahead of print]

Association between sleep duration and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Goyang, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: jinylove14@hanmail.net.
2
Department of Family Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Goyang, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea; Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: hongbai96@mjh.or.kr.
3
Department of Family Medicine, Myongji Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Goyang, Gyeonggi Province, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: skska2@naver.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several previous meta-analyses have investigated the association between sleep quality and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To examine the relationship between short or long sleep duration and ADHD, a meta-analysis of observational studies was conducted.

METHODS:

The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched in March 2019 to retrieve observational studies. A random-effects model was used to analyze meta-estimates of sleep duration. Three evaluators independently reviewed and selected the articles based on pre-determined selection criteria.

RESULTS:

Of 1466 articles retrieved, 10 observational epidemiological studies, comprising six case-control studies and four prospective cohort studies, were included in the final analysis. Short sleep duration was significantly linked to ADHD compared with average sleep duration (odds ratio [OR] or relative risk [RR] 1.28 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.41]), and especially with hyperactivity (OR/RR 1.60 [95% CI 1.18-2.17]). Subgroup meta-analyses according to various factors, such as study design, number of participants, methodological quality, and adjustment for smoking status and education, yielded consistent results. A significant association between long sleep duration and ADHD was not observed.

LIMITATIONS:

Publication bias and substantial heterogeneity due to the diverse measurement tools used to determine ADHD were observed. Lack of prospective cohort studies was another limitation.

CONCLUSION:

Short sleep duration was associated with ADHD in the current meta-analysis. Clinicians may need to be more aware of this association.

KEYWORDS:

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; Long sleep duration; Meta-analysis; Observational study; Short sleep duration

PMID:
31158717
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2019.05.071

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center