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Bone. 2019 May 31;127:37-43. doi: 10.1016/j.bone.2019.05.037. [Epub ahead of print]

Causal link between lipid profile and bone mineral density: A Mendelian randomization study.

Author information

1
Center for Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Jiangsu, PR China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, PR China. Electronic address: 20174247003@stu.suda.edu.cn.
2
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, PR China; Department of Child Health, School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Jiangsu, PR China.
3
Center for Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Jiangsu, PR China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, PR China.
4
Department of Global Biostatistics and Data Science, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA. Electronic address: yliu8@tulane.edu.
5
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, PR China; Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Medical College, Soochow University, Jiangsu, PR China. Electronic address: ypei@suda.edu.cn.
6
Center for Genetic Epidemiology and Genomics, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Jiangsu, PR China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Preventive and Translational Medicine for Geriatric Diseases, PR China. Electronic address: lzhang6@suda.edu.cn.

Abstract

The level of serum lipids is associated with bone mineral density (BMD), an important skeletal trait. Yet the causality has not been determined. Here we performed a Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis to test potential causal links between BMD and lipid profile, i.e., low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDC-c), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c). We observed causal effect of LDL-c, TC and TG to BMD, and reversely the effect of BMD to HDL-c. We further explored the effect of body mass index (BMI) in these causalities and found that the effect of LDL-c, TC and TG to BMD is independent of BMI. Our findings provided useful information in the clinical relevance of blood lipids on BMD variation and osteoporosis risk.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Bone mineral density; Causal effect; Lipid profile; Mendelian randomization

PMID:
31158506
DOI:
10.1016/j.bone.2019.05.037

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