Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Endocrine. 2019 Aug;65(2):286-294. doi: 10.1007/s12020-019-01963-4. Epub 2019 May 31.

Effect of Nigella Sativa oil versus metformin on glycemic control and biochemical parameters of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

Author information

1
Department of pharmacy practice, Faculty of Pharmacy and drug technology, Heliopolis University for Sustainable Development, Cairo Governorate, Egypt.
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo Governorate, Egypt. lamywak@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Internal Medicine and Endocrinology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo Governorate, Egypt.
4
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo Governorate, Egypt.
5
Department of pharmacology & toxicology, faculty of pharmacy and drug technology, Heliopolis University for Sustainable Development, Cairo Governorate, Egypt.
6
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo Governorate, Egypt.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Nature is a phenomenal treasure of remedies. Numerous previous studies reported that Nigella sativa NS improved glycemic control, reduced insulin resistance, and improved lipid profile. NS was never investigated before as a monotherapy for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus T2DM patients. Our aim was to investigate the potential metabolic benefits of NS monotherapy in newly diagnosed T2DM patients.

METHOD:

Prospective, open-label randomized clinical trial at outpatient endocrinology clinic at Ain-Shams University hospital. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to either metformin tablets or NS oil capsules. Both groups received treatment for 3 months. Glycemic index (FBG, 2 h pp, A1C, insulin sensitivity %S, secretory function %B, insulin resistance IR), lipid profile (TC, LDL, HDL, TG), liver and kidney functions (AST, ALT, Sr cr), total antioxidant capacity TAC, weight, waist circumference WC and body mass index BMI were assessed at baseline and at the end of treatment period.

RESULTS:

A concentration of 1350 mg/day NS in newly diagnosed T2DM patients was inferior to metformin in terms of lowering FBG, 2 h pp, and A1C or increasing %B. However, NS was comparable to metformin in lowering weight, WC, and BMI significantly. NS was comparable to metformin in regards of their effects on fasting insulin, %S, IR, ALT, TC, LDL, HDL, TG, and TAC. Metformin showed significant increase in AST and creatinine which was reserved in NS group.

CONCLUSION:

NS administration in newly diagnosed T2DM was tolerable with no side effects as compared to metformin; however, it was inferior to metformin in terms of diabetes management.

KEYWORDS:

Metformin; Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus; Nigella sativa

PMID:
31152309
DOI:
10.1007/s12020-019-01963-4

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center