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PLoS One. 2019 May 31;14(5):e0216326. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0216326. eCollection 2019.

Intestinal epithelial replacement by transplantation of cultured murine and human cells into the small intestine.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, CHS 72-215, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
2
Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Mattel Children's Hospital and the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
3
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
4
Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America.
5
Department of Surgery, VA Greater Los Angeles Health System, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Adult intestinal epithelial stem cells are a promising resource for treatment of intestinal epithelial disorders that cause intestinal failure and for intestinal tissue engineering. We developed two different animal models to study the implantation of cultured murine and human intestinal epithelial cells in the less differentiated "spheroid" state and the more differentiated "enteroid" state into the denuded small intestine of mice. Engraftment of donor cells could not be achieved while the recipient intestine remained in continuity. However, we were able to demonstrate successful implantation of murine and human epithelial cells when the graft segment was in a bypassed loop of jejunum. Implantation of donor cells occurred in a random fashion in villus and crypt areas. Engraftment was observed in 75% of recipients for murine and 36% of recipients for human cells. Engrafted spheroid cells differentiated into the full complement of intestinal epithelial cells. These findings demonstrate for the first time successful engraftment into the small bowel which is optimized in a bypassed loop surgical model.

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