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Biol Trace Elem Res. 2019 May 30. doi: 10.1007/s12011-019-01751-1. [Epub ahead of print]

Studies of Selenium Deficiency in the Wumeng Semi-Fine Wool Sheep.

Huo B1, Wu T1, Song C1, Shen X2,3,4.

Author information

1
School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010, China.
2
School of Life Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang, 621010, China. kjixyshenxy@163.com.
3
State Engineering Technology Institute for Karst Desertification Control, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang, 550025, China. kjixyshenxy@163.com.
4
World Bank Poverty Alleviation Project Office in Guizhou, Southwest China, Guiyang, 550004, China. kjixyshenxy@163.com.

Abstract

Wumeng semi-fine wool sheep are affected by a disease, characterized by emaciation, stiffness and trembling of the limbs, weakness and inability to stand, and sudden death. The objective of the study was to determine possible relationships between the disease and mineral deficiencies. Samples of wool, blood, and liver were collected from affected and healthy sheep. Samples of soil and forage were collected from affected and unaffected areas. The samples were used for hematological and biochemical analyses and mineral nutrient measurements. Results showed that selenium concentrations in forage and soil samples from affected areas were significantly lower than those from unaffected areas (P < 0.01). Meanwhile, selenium concentrations of wool, blood, and liver from the affected sheep were also significantly lower than those from the healthy sheep (P < 0.01). The mean concentration of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) from the affected sheep were significantly lower than those from the healthy sheep (P < 0.01). Serum glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activity in the affected sheep were significantly lower than those in the healthy sheep (P < 0.01). Serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and malondialdehyde (MDA) values in the affected sheep were significantly higher than those in the healthy sheep (P < 0.01). Serum concentrations of free triiodothyronine (FT3) and triiodothyronine (TT3) in the affected sheep were significantly lower than those in the healthy sheep; serum concentrations of free tetraiodothyronine (FT4) and tetraiodothyronine (TT4) in the affected sheep were significantly higher than those in the healthy sheep (P < 0.01). But the administration of selenium and vitamin E by hypodermic injection prevented and cured the disease. The injection contains 0.1% and 5% of sodium selenite and vitamin E, respectively. A single dose is 6, 6, and 2 mL for mature ewe, mature ram, and lamb, respectively, repeated only once 15 days later. This study demonstrated that the disorder of Wumeng semi-fine wool sheep was mainly caused by the selenium deficiency in soil and forage.

KEYWORDS:

Mineral metabolism; Selenium deficiency; Wumeng mountains area; Wumeng semi-fine wool sheep

PMID:
31147978
DOI:
10.1007/s12011-019-01751-1

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