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J Gen Intern Med. 2019 May 29. doi: 10.1007/s11606-019-05023-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Emergency Physician Opioid Prescribing and Risk of Long-term Use in the Veterans Health Administration: an Observational Analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion (CHERP), VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, University Drive, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
5
Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
6
Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
7
Center for High Value Health Care, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC), Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
8
Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion (CHERP), VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, University Drive, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. walid.gellad@va.gov.
9
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. walid.gellad@va.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment by high-opioid prescribing physicians in the emergency department (ED) is associated with higher rates of long-term opioid use among Medicare beneficiaries. However, it is unclear if this result is true in other high-risk populations such as Veterans.

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate the effect of exposure to high-opioid prescribing physicians on long-term opioid use for opioid-naïve Veterans.

DESIGN:

Observational study using Veterans Health Administration (VA) encounter and prescription data.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

Veterans with an index ED visit at any VA facility in 2012 and without opioid prescriptions in the prior 6 months in the VA system ("opioid naïve").

MEASUREMENTS:

We assigned patients to emergency physicians and categorized physicians into within-hospital quartiles based on their opioid prescribing rates. Our primary outcome was long-term opioid use, defined as 6 months of days supplied in the 12 months subsequent to the ED visit. We compared rates of long-term opioid use among patients treated by high versus low quartile prescribers, adjusting for patient demographic, clinical characteristics, and ED diagnoses.

RESULTS:

We identified 57,738 and 86,393 opioid-naïve Veterans managed by 362 and 440 low and high quartile prescribers, respectively. Patient characteristics were similar across groups. ED opioid prescribing rates varied more than threefold between the low and high quartile prescribers within hospitals (6.4% vs. 20.8%, p < 0.001). The frequency of long-term opioid use was higher among Veterans treated by high versus low quartile prescribers, though above the threshold for statistical significance (1.39% vs. 1.26%; adjusted OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.997-1.24, p = 0.056). In subgroup analyses, there were significant associations for patients with back pain (adjusted OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.55, p = 0.04) and for those with a history of depression (adjusted OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.08-1.51, p = 0.004).

CONCLUSIONS:

ED physician opioid prescribing varied by over 300% within facility, with a statistically non-significant increased rate of long-term use among opioid-naïve Veterans exposed to the highest intensity prescribers.

KEYWORDS:

Veteran; emergency; opioid; prescribing

PMID:
31144281
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-019-05023-5

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