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Nutrients. 2019 May 28;11(6). pii: E1214. doi: 10.3390/nu11061214.

Nutritional Composition of Brazilian Food Products Marketed to Children.

Author information

1
Nutrition in Foodservice Research Centre, Nutrition Post Graduation Program, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil. marthalmachado@gmail.com.
2
Nutrition in Foodservice Research Centre, Nutrition Post Graduation Program, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil. v.mellorodrigues@yahoo.com.br.
3
Nutrition in Foodservice Research Centre, Department of Nutrition, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil. amanda.bagolin@ufsc.br.
4
Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, UK. moira.dean@qub.ac.uk.
5
Nutrition in Foodservice Research Centre, Nutrition Post Graduation Program, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis 88040-900, Brazil. giovanna.fiates@ufsc.br.

Abstract

Most food industry marketing in products targeted at children is found in packages of foods containing either excessive fat, sugar, or salt. This study audited all 5620 packaged foods available in a store of a large Brazilian supermarket chain and retrieved information from the nutrition facts tables on package labels. Products were photographed for further visual analysis to determine the presence of marketing strategies directed at children. Comparison of nutrient content per 100 g between children's and non-children's food products employed the Student t-test or the Mann-Whitney U-test (p-value < 0.05), due to the non-normal distribution of the nutritional composition data as verified through the Shapiro-Wilk test. Brazilian children's food products from groups 4, 5, and 7 presented higher carbohydrate content than similar non-children's products, while children's food products from groups 1 and 7 presented lower fiber content. Results indicate that regulation on food labeling needs revising as it has not been effective in stopping the marketing of energy-dense nutrient-poor foods towards children.

KEYWORDS:

children; food products; marketing; nutrient content; nutrition labeling; packages

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