Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JAMA Surg. 2019 May 29. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2019.1168. [Epub ahead of print]

Comparison of Cinematic Rendering and Computed Tomography for Speed and Comprehension of Surgical Anatomy.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.
2
Institute of Radiology, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.

Abstract

Importance:

Three-dimensional (3-D) volume rendering has been shown to improve visualization in general surgery. Cinematic rendering (CR), a novel 3-D visualization technology for postprocessing of computed tomographaphy (CT) images, provides photorealistic images with the potential to improve visualization of anatomic details.

Objective:

To determine the value of CR for the comprehension of the surgical anatomy.

Design, Setting, and Participants:

This preclinical, randomized, 2-sequence crossover study was conducted from February to November 1, 2018, at University Hospital of Erlangen, Germany. The 40 patient cases were evaluated by 18 resident and attending surgeons using a prepared set of CT and CR images. The patient cases were randomized to 2 assessment sequences (CR-CT and CT-CR). During each assessment period, participants answered 1 question per case that addressed crucial issues of anatomic understanding, preoperative planning, and intraoperative strategies. After a washout period of 2 weeks, case evaluations were crossed over to the respective second image modality.

Main Outcomes and Measures:

The primary outcome measure was the correctness of answers. Secondary outcome was the time needed to answer.

Results:

The mean (SD) interperiod differences for the percentage of correct answers in the CR-CT sequence (8.5% [7.0%]) differed significantly from those in the CT-CR sequence (-13.1% [6.3%]) (P < .001). The mean (SD) interperiod differences for the time spent to answer the questions in the CR-CT sequence (-18.3 [76.9] seconds) also differed significantly from those in the CT-CR sequence (52.4 [88.5] seconds) (P < .001). Subgroup analysis revealed that residents as well as attending physicians benefitted from CR visualization. Analysis of the case assessment questionnaire showed that CR added significant value to the comprehension of the surgical anatomy (overall mean [SD] score, 4.53 [0.75]). No carryover or period effects were observed.

Conclusions and Relevance:

The visualization with CR allowed a more correct and faster comprehension of the surgical anatomy compared with conventional CT imaging, independent of level of surgeon experience. Therefore, CR may assist general surgeons with preoperative preparation and intraoperative guidance.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center