Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Cell Physiol. 2019 May 29. doi: 10.1002/jcp.28893. [Epub ahead of print]

A red orange and lemon by-products extract rich in anthocyanins inhibits the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Productions, University of Naples "Federico II", Napoli, Italy.
2
Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Napoli, Italy.
3
Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy.
4
Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation - Division of Nephrology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy.
5
Department of Medical Biotechnologies, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
6
Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Center of Biotechnology, College of Science and Technology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
7
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics, Research Center for Olive, Citrus and Tree Fruit, Acireale, Italy.
8
Cell Biology and Biotherapy Unit, Istituto Nazionale Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale"-IRCCS, Napoli, Italy.

Abstract

The major cause of end-stage renal disease is the diabetic nephropathy. Oxidative stress contributes to the development of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this study we have evaluated the effect of a diet with a new standardized of red orange and lemon extract (RLE) rich in anthocyanins (ANT) in the progression of the kidney disease on Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Oxidative stress and renal function were analyzed. In diabetic rats, the RLE restored the blood glucose levels, body weight, and normalized the reactive oxygen species (ROS) total pathways. The kidney inflammation, in diabetic rats, has not shown significant change, showing that the oxidative stress rather than to inflammatory processes is a triggering factor in the renal complication associated with T2DM. Therefore, the administration of the RLE prevents this complication and this effect could be related to the inhibition of ROS production.

KEYWORDS:

anthocyanins; diabetic nephropathy; reactive oxygen species; renal micropuncture

PMID:
31140616
DOI:
10.1002/jcp.28893

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center