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Ann Clin Transl Neurol. 2019 Apr 11;6(5):945-953. doi: 10.1002/acn3.740. eCollection 2019 May.

Clinical significance of soluble adhesion molecules in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients.

Ding Y1,2, Yang C3,4, Zhou Z4,5, Peng Y1, Chen J1, Pan S1, Xu H4, Cai Y6, Ou K7, Xie W2,8, Wang H1.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology Nanfang Hospital Southern Medical University Guangzhou China.
2
School of Traditional Chinese Medicine Southern Medical University Guangzhou China.
3
Guangdong Provincial People's Hospital Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences Guangdong Mental Health Center Guangzhou China.
4
The Second School of Clinical Medicine Southern Medical University Guangdong Province China.
5
Department of Neurology Liuzhou Traditional Chinese Medical Hospital Liuzhou China.
6
Hexian Memorial Hospital Guangzhou China.
7
Department of Neurology Laibin People's Hospital Laibin China.
8
Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine Nanfang Hospital Southern Medical University Guangzhou China.

Abstract

Increasing evidence indicates that immune system dysfunction affects anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis. This study aims to investigate the relationship between adhesion molecules and the pathophysiology in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Soluble forms of Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), and L-selectin (sL-selectin), were measured in the CSF and serum of 26 participants with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, 11 patients with schizophrenia and 22 patients with noninflammatory disorders. CSF levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and sL-selectin were significantly elevated in the anti-NMDAR encephalitis group. sVCAM-1 levels were positively associated with modified Rankin scale score in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients at the onset and 3-month follow-up.

Conflict of interest statement

All authors read and approved the final manuscript. They declare no conflicts of interest.

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