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Molecules. 2019 May 24;24(10). pii: E2003. doi: 10.3390/molecules24102003.

Effects of Diethyl Phosphate, a Non-Specific Metabolite of Organophosphorus Pesticides, on Serum Lipid, Hormones, Inflammation, and Gut Microbiota.

Yang F1, Li J2, Pang G3,4, Ren F5,6, Fang B7.

Author information

1
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. fwyang@cau.edu.cn.
2
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. sdlijinwang@sina.com.
3
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. 519-02@cau.edu.cn.
4
Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing 100176, China. 519-02@cau.edu.cn.
5
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. renfazheng@cau.edu.cn.
6
Key Laboratory of Functional Dairy, Co-Constructed by Ministry of Education and Beijing Government, and Beijing Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. renfazheng@cau.edu.cn.
7
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. bingfang@cau.edu.cn.

Abstract

Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) can be metabolized to diethyl phosphate (DEP) in the gut environment, which may affect the immune and endocrine systems and the microbiota. Correlations between OPs and diseases have been established by epidemiological studies, mainly based on the contents of their metabolites, including DEP, in the serum or urine. However, the effects of DEP require further study. Therefore, in this study, adult male rats were exposed to 0.08 or 0.13 mg/kg DEP for 20 weeks. Serum levels of hormones, lipids, and inflammatory cytokines as well as gut microbiota were measured. DEP significantly enriched opportunistic pathogens, including Paraprevotella, Parabacteroides, Alloprevotella, and Helicobacter, leading to a decrease in interleukin-6 (IL-6). Exposure to the high dose of DEP enriched the butyrate-producing genera, Alloprevotella and Intestinimonas, leading to an increase in estradiol and a resulting decrease in total triglycerides (TGs) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C); meanwhile, DEP-induced increases in peptide tyrosine‒tyrosine (PYY) and ghrelin were attributed to the enrichment of short-chain fatty acid-producing Clostridium sensu stricto 1 and Lactobacillus. These findings indicate that measuring the effects of DEP is not a proxy for measuring the effects of its parent compounds.

KEYWORDS:

DNA sequencing; endocrine system; hormones; inflammation; microbiome

PMID:
31137755
PMCID:
PMC6572208
DOI:
10.3390/molecules24102003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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