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Cell Metab. 2019 Aug 6;30(2):364-373.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2019.05.002. Epub 2019 May 23.

Nutrient Sensing in CD11c Cells Alters the Gut Microbiota to Regulate Food Intake and Body Mass.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0795, USA.
2
Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
3
Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0795, USA; Centre for Inflammatory Diseases, Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
4
Center for Molecular Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
5
Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0795, USA; Departments of Physiology and Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0795, USA. Electronic address: ajay.chawla@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Microbial dysbiosis and inflammation are implicated in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. However, it is not known whether crosstalk between immunity and microbiota also regulates metabolic homeostasis in healthy animals. Here, we report that genetic deletion of tuberous sclerosis 1 (Tsc1) in CD11c+ myeloid cells (Tsc1f/fCD11cCre mice) reduced food intake and body mass in the absence of metabolic disease. Co-housing and fecal transplant experiments revealed a dominant role for the healthy gut microbiota in regulation of body weight. 16S rRNA sequencing, selective culture, and reconstitution experiments further confirmed that selective deficiency of Lactobacillus johnsonii Q1-7 contributed to decreased food intake and body mass in Tsc1f/fCD11cCre mice. Mechanistically, activation of mTORC1 signaling in CD11c cells regulated production of L. johnsonii Q1-7-specific IgA, allowing for its stable colonization in the gut. Together, our findings reveal an unexpected transkingdom immune-microbiota feedback loop for homeostatic regulation of food intake and body mass in mammals.

KEYWORDS:

IgA; Lactobacillus; cohousing; comparative genomics; coprophagia; energy balance; immunometabolism; innate immunity; phylogenetics

PMID:
31130466
PMCID:
PMC6687538
[Available on 2020-08-06]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2019.05.002

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