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Tuberk Toraks. 2019 Mar;67(1):31-38. doi: 10.5578/tt.68041.

Clinical challenges in elderly asthma.

Author information

1
Department of Chest Diseases, Faculty of Cerrahpasa Medicine, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
2
Faculty of Cerrahpasa Medicine, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.
3
Student, Faculty of Cerrahpasa Medicine, Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

Introduction:

Understanding the difference of elderly asthma is essential to provide better healthcare for this vulnerable population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences between young and elderly asthma patients.

Materials and Methods:

This real-life study was designed as a cross-sectional analysis. All data collected with structured web based asthma program. In sum, 373 (89.9%) young asthma (YA, age < 65) and 42 (10.1%) elderly asthma (EA, age < 65) patients followed at least one year and compared statistically.

Result:

Cough is found higher in EA (p< 0.01) despite lower smoking rate in EA (p< 0.001). Allergic rhinitis and allergic conjunctivitis were more common in YA (p< 0.05, p< 0.01) which is consistent with higher allergy rate in YA (p< 0.05). On the other hand, diabetes and hypertension were determined significantly higher in EA (p< 0.01, p< 0.01). 52.4% of EA patients were found to have low diffusion capacity (DLCO < 80%). Although EA patients use combined therapies with inhaled corticosteroids and long acting beta agonists more than YA patients (p< 0.01), both emergency room visit (ERV) and hospitalization ratios are founded significantly higher in EA (p< 0.001, p< 0.001).

Conclusions:

EA patients were presented with cough in general. They possess an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes and low levels of diffusion capacity. ERV and hospitalization ratios have founded higher despite higher usage of combined therapies.

PMID:
31130133
DOI:
10.5578/tt.68041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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