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J Clin Lipidol. 2019 Jul - Aug;13(4):645-653.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jacl.2019.04.007. Epub 2019 May 17.

Association between circadian preference and blood lipid levels using a 1:1:1 propensity score matching analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Yong-In Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gyoung-gi, Republic of Korea; Department of Medicine, Graduate School of Yonsei University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Health Medicine, Severance Hospital, Severance check-up, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Research Affairs, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance Health Check-up, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Division of Cardiology, Severance Cardiovascular Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: cardiobk@yuhs.ac.
6
Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: indi5645@yuhs.ac.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies indicate that circadian preference is associated with various energy metabolism and metabolic disorders. However, little is known about the associations between a circadian rhythm and blood lipid levels, especially in humans.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to investigate whether the circadian rhythm affects serum lipid levels in Korean adults.

METHODS:

We designed a cross-sectional study to evaluate the associations between circadian preference and blood lipid levels in Korean adults. A total of 1984 participants (range of age 19-81 years) were included in this study. Propensity scores were calculated using logistic regression with age, sex, and body mass index. A total of 435 subjects were evaluated by propensity score matching analysis, equally distributed into morningness, intermediate, and eveningness groups, each with 145 subjects. Circadian preference was evaluated by the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire.

RESULTS:

Participants with the evening preference had significantly higher levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) when compared with those with morning or intermediate preference, after adjusting for confounding variables. Regarding other lipid parameters, both total cholesterol/HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/HDL-C in the evening preference are significantly higher than those of other circadian preferences. Evening preference was also significantly associated with a higher atherogenic index of plasma.

CONCLUSION:

Our study demonstrates that there is a significant association between circadian preference and blood lipid levels. Our findings suggest that individuals with evening preference could have a greater risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Circadian preference; Lipid profile; Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire

PMID:
31126864
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacl.2019.04.007

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