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Air Med J. 2019 May - Jun;38(3):154-160. doi: 10.1016/j.amj.2019.02.001. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

The Rapid Emergency Medicine Score: A Critical Appraisal of Its Measurement Properties and Applicability to the Air Retrieval Environment.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: brodie.nolan@mail.utoronto.ca.
2
Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS) was designed to predict in-hospital mortality using variables that are available in the prehospital setting. The objective of this article is to critically appraise the development and summarize the evidence regarding the measurement properties (sensitivity, reliability and validity) of the REMS.

METHODS:

A literature search was performed identifying all studies describing the REMS. The original validation study was critically appraised for its development. All other studies that reported any measurement properties of the REMS were also appraised for evidence of calibration, reliability, and validity.

RESULTS:

In total, 26 studies reported on the measurement properties of the REMS. Overall, the REMS was developed with robust methodology and has good sensibility with adequate content and face validity. It is easy to understand and feasible to be calculated within minutes of patient assessment. The REMS has the necessary measurement properties to be both a predictive and evaluative clinical index to measure prehospital severity of illness; however, no studies have adequately addressed the intra or inter-rater reliability of the score.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is evidence to support the use of the REMS as a predictive or evaluative instrument. In most studies, it performed as well or better than other illness severity scores in predicting mortality.

PMID:
31122578
DOI:
10.1016/j.amj.2019.02.001

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