Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biosens Bioelectron. 2019 Jul 15;137:236-254. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2019.02.070. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

On-chip anticancer drug screening - Recent progress in microfluidic platforms to address challenges in chemotherapy.

Author information

1
Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cells Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Kandi, Telangana, India; Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Engineering Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.
2
Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Engineering Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.
3
Creative & Advanced Research Based On Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Kandi, Telangana, India.
4
Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cells Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Kandi, Telangana, India. Electronic address: subharath@iith.ac.in.

Abstract

There is an increasing need for advanced and inexpensive preclinical models to accelerate the development of anticancer drugs. While costly animal models fail to predict human clinical outcomes, in vitro models such as microfluidic chips ('tumor-on-chip') are showing tremendous promise at predicting and providing meaningful preclinical drug screening outcomes. Research on 'tumor-on-chips' has grown enormously worldwide and is being widely accepted by pharmaceutical companies as a drug development tool. In light of this shift in philosophy, it is important to review the recent literature on microfluidic devices to determine how rapidly the technology has progressed as a promising model for drug screening and aiding cancer therapy. We review the past five years of successful developments and capabilities in microdevice technology (cancer models) for use in anticancer drug screening. Microfluidic devices that are being designed to address current challenges in chemotherapy, such as drug resistance, combinatorial drug therapy, personalized medicine, and cancer metastasis are also reviewed in detail. We provide a perspective on how personalized 'tumor-on-chip', as well as high-throughput microfluidic platforms based on patient-specific tumor cells, can potentially replace the more expensive and 'non-human' animal models in preclinical anticancer drug development.

KEYWORDS:

Anticancer; Cancer metastasis; Drug resistance; Drug screening; Microfluidics; Tumor-on-chip

PMID:
31121461
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2019.02.070

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center