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Infect Genet Evol. 2019 Sep;73:322-331. doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2019.05.016. Epub 2019 May 20.

Scalp microbiota alterations in children with pediculosis.

Author information

1
Post-Graduate Program in Microbiology, Parasitology and Pathology, Basic Pathology Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.
2
Biomedical, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.
3
Student in Biology, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.
4
Student in Biomedicine, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.
5
Post-Graduate Program in Microbiology, Parasitology and Pathology, Basic Pathology Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil; Basic Pathology Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil.
6
Parasitology Department, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
7
Post-Graduate Program in Microbiology, Parasitology and Pathology, Basic Pathology Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil; Basic Pathology Department, Federal University of Parana, Curitiba, Brazil. Electronic address: deborak@ufpr.br.

Abstract

Pediculosis is a disease caused by the insect Pediculus humanus capitis that mainly occurs in childhood. A comparative study was carried out evaluating groups of schoolchildren with (group A) and without pediculosis (group B) to analyse the characteristics of the scalp microbiota. Samples were collected by swab using Stuart transport medium and incubate in Sabouraud dextrose agar with tetracycline to analyse the fungal microbiota and in blood agar to assess the bacterial microbiota. The isolates identity was confirmed by sequencing of the 16S and 18S regions of the ribosomal DNA gene for bacteria and fungi, respectively. The analysis of the 186 isolates led to the identification of 35 bacteria and 40 fungi in group A and 47 bacteria and 64 fungi in group B. The results indicate differences in bacterial and fungal species in the groups analysed. In the observed bacterial microbiota, Staphylococcus capitis occurred more frequently than Staphylococcus epidermidis in group A vs B. Among fungal isolates, Debaryomyces sp. was more frequent in group B vs A. Our findings showed scalp microbiota alterations in children with pediculosis, meriting future studies to analyse the relationship between these agents and their impact on human health.

KEYWORDS:

Bacterial; Children; Fungal; Pediculus humanus capitis

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