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Front Nutr. 2019 Apr 30;6:55. doi: 10.3389/fnut.2019.00055. eCollection 2019.

Greek Yogurt and 12 Weeks of Exercise Training on Strength, Muscle Thickness and Body Composition in Lean, Untrained, University-Aged Males.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada.
2
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
Centre for Bone and Muscle Health, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Milk and/or whey protein plus resistance exercise (RT) increase strength and muscle size, and optimize body composition in adult males and females. Greek yogurt (GY) contains similar muscle-supporting nutrients as milk yet it is different in several ways including being a semi-solid food, containing bacterial cultures and having a higher protein content (mostly casein) per serving. GY has yet to be investigated in the context of a RT program. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of GY consumption plus RT on strength, muscle thickness and body composition in lean, untrained, university-aged males. Thirty untrained, university-aged (20.6 ± 2.2 years) males were randomized to 2 groups (n = 15/group): fat-free, plain GY or a Placebo Pudding (PP; isoenergetic carbohydrate-based pudding) and underwent a combined RT/plyometric training program 3 days/week for 12 weeks. They consumed either GY (20 g protein/dose) or PP (0 g protein/dose) daily, 3 times on training days and 2 times on non-training days. After 12 weeks, both groups significantly increased strength, muscle thickness and fat-free mass (FFM) (p < 0.05). The GY group gained more total strength (GY; 98 ± 37 kg, PP; 57 ± 15 kg), more biceps brachii muscular thickness (GY; 0.46 ± 0.3 cm, PP; 0.12 ± 0.2 cm), more FFM (GY; 2.4 ± 1.5 kg, PP; 1.3 ± 1.3 kg), and reduced % body fat (GY; -1.1 ± 2.2%, PP; 0.1 ± 2.6%) than PP group (p < 0.05 expressed as absolute change). Thus, consumption of GY during a training program resulted in improved strength, muscle thickness and body composition over a carbohydrate-based placebo. Given the results of our study, the general benefits of consuming GY and its distinctiveness from milk, GY can be a plausible, post-exercise, nutrient-rich alternative for positive strength, muscle, and body composition adaptations.

KEYWORDS:

Greek yogurt; body composition; intervention study; muscle thickness; muscular strength; protein nutrition; resistance training program; young males

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