Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br J Cancer. 2019 Jul;121(1):86-94. doi: 10.1038/s41416-019-0454-1. Epub 2019 May 22.

Physical activity during adolescence and risk of colorectal adenoma later in life: results from the Nurses' Health Study II.

Rezende LFM1,2, Lee DH2, Keum N3,4, Nimptsch K2,5, Song M2,6,7,8, Lee IM8,9, Eluf-Neto J1, Ogino S8,10,11, Fuchs C12, Meyerhardt J13, Chan AT6,7,11,14,15, Willett W2,8,14, Giovannucci E2,8,14, Wu K2.

Author information

1
Departamento de Medicina Preventiva, Faculdade de Medicina FMUSP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
2
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. nak212@mail.harvard.edu.
4
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Dongguk University, Goyang, South Korea. nak212@mail.harvard.edu.
5
Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Berlin, Germany.
6
Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, USA.
12
Yale Cancer Center; Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine; Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA.
13
Dana Faber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA.
14
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
15
Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physical activity during adulthood has been consistently associated with lower risk of colorectal cancers, but whether physical activity during adolescence may also play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unclear.

METHODS:

We included 28,250 women in the Nurses' Health Study II who provided data on physical activity during adolescence (ages 12-22 years) in 1997 and underwent lower bowel endoscopy (1998-2011). We used logistic regression models for clustered data to examine the association between physical activity during adolescence and risk of adenoma later in life.

RESULTS:

Physical activity during adolescence was inversely associated with risk of colorectal adenoma (2373 cases), independent of physical activity during adulthood. The multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of adenoma was 0.89 (95% CI 0.77-1.02; Ptrend = 0.03) comparing women with ≥ 72 metabolic equivalent of tasks-hours/week (MET-h/week) to < 21 MET-h/week. Women with high physical activity during both adolescence (≥53.3 MET-h/week) and adulthood (≥23.1 MET-h/week) had significantly lower risk of adenoma (all adenomas: OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.66-0.88; advanced adenoma: OR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45-0.82) compared to women with low physical activity during both stages of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that physical activity during adolescence may lower the risk of colorectal adenoma later in life.

PMID:
31114018
PMCID:
PMC6738055
[Available on 2020-05-22]
DOI:
10.1038/s41416-019-0454-1

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center