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Behav Brain Res. 2019 Sep 16;370:111946. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2019.111946. Epub 2019 May 18.

Prenatal immune activation induces age-related alterations in rat offspring: Effects upon NMDA receptors and behaviors.

Author information

1
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Institute of Psychiatry and Neuroscience of Xinxiang Medical University. Electronic address: kekehao15@163.com.
2
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: suxi198919@163.com.
3
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: 13383806765@163.com.
4
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: CYQ97670@163.com.
5
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: 1253880826@qq.com.
6
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: yongfeng200888@126.com.
7
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: longtian168o@163.com.
8
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: song.meng.201@163.com.
9
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: hertales@126.com.
10
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: zzxzzx9268@163.com.
11
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: lwq781603@163.com.
12
Henan Mental Hospital, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, China; Henan Key Lab of Biological Psychiatry of Xinxiang Medical University, China. Electronic address: lvx928@126.com.

Abstract

Prenatal exposure to polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) results in psychotic-like behavior in mature rat offspring as well as enduring modifications of glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission. However, little is known about the dynamic behavioral and glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor changes in rat offspring following poly I:C treatment of pregnant dams. In this study, poly I:C was administered to rats intravenously at a dose of 10 mg/kg on gestational day 9 in order to assess changes in behavior and NMDA receptors in offspring over time. Results demonstrate progressive worsening behaviors in adolescents and adults that manifest as increased anxiety, cognitive impairment, and pre-pulse inhibition deficits. Age-related alteration of NMDA receptors in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, either total number or distribution, were observed from weaning to adulthood. These results suggest that abnormalities of NMDA receptors occur prior to obvious schizophrenia-like behavioral manifestations. Hence, NMDA receptors may be potential therapeutic targets to prevent disease development during asymptomatic periods of schizophrenia, and may serve as targets for preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia. Further, PSD95, a scaffolding protein that is a component of the NMDA receptor signaling complex, is increased in the hippocampus of adult offspring, when serious behavioral abnormalities emerge. This result suggests that PSD95 may be involved in behavioral abnormalities of schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

Age-related; Behavior; NMDA receptor; PSD95; Poly I:C

PMID:
31112730
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2019.111946
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