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Nat Immunol. 2019 Jun;20(6):756-764. doi: 10.1038/s41590-019-0404-3. Epub 2019 May 20.

Tissue patrol by resident memory CD8+ T cells in human skin.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Oncology and Immunology, Oncode Institute, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
2
Department of Dermatology and Netherlands Institute for Pigment Disorders, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
3
Research Facility, Sanquin Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
4
BioImaging Facility, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
5
Animal Pathology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
6
Division of Drug Discovery and Safety, Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research, Leiden University, Leiden, the Netherlands.
7
Division of Molecular Oncology and Immunology, Oncode Institute, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. t.schumacher@nki.nl.

Abstract

Emerging data show that tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells play an important protective role at murine and human barrier sites. TRM cells in the epidermis of mouse skin patrol their surroundings and rapidly respond when antigens are encountered. However, whether a similar migratory behavior is performed by human TRM cells is unclear, as technology to longitudinally follow them in situ has been lacking. To address this issue, we developed an ex vivo culture system to label and track T cells in fresh skin samples. We validated this system by comparing in vivo and ex vivo properties of murine TRM cells. Using nanobody labeling, we subsequently demonstrated in human ex vivo skin that CD8+ TRM cells migrated through the papillary dermis and the epidermis, below sessile Langerhans cells. Collectively, this work allows the dynamic study of resident immune cells in human skin and provides evidence of tissue patrol by human CD8+ TRM cells.

PMID:
31110315
DOI:
10.1038/s41590-019-0404-3

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