Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Mol Med. 2019 Jul;25(7):626-639. doi: 10.1016/j.molmed.2019.04.002. Epub 2019 May 17.

Modifying the Organ Matrix Pre-engraftment: A New Transplant Paradigm?

Author information

1
The Center for Personalized Diagnostics, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; The Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; Joint first authors.
2
Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; Department of Clinical Pathomorphology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland; Joint first authors.
3
The Center for Personalized Diagnostics, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; The Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
4
Department of Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
5
First Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland.
6
The Center for Personalized Diagnostics, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; The Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA.
7
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; The Department of Tumor Surgery, Second Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. Electronic address: chenhao3996913@163.com.
8
The Center for Personalized Diagnostics, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; The Center for Immunotherapy, Vaccines and Virotherapy, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; Department of Medicine, St Joseph's Hospital, Dignity Health, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Electronic address: alexluc1@asu.edu.

Abstract

The availability of solid organs for transplantation remains low and there is a substantial need for methods to preserve the viability of grafted tissues. Suppression of solid-organ transplant rejection has traditionally focused on highly effective T cell inhibitors that block host immune lymphocyte responses. However, persistent and destructive innate and acquired immune reactions remain difficult to treat, causing late graft loss. Pretreatment of grafts to reduce organ rejection provides an alternate strategy. Approaches using antithrombotics, stem cells, genetic modifications, modulation of infrastructural components (connective tissue, CT; glycocalyx) of donor organs, and engineering of new organs are under investigation. We discuss here new approaches to modify transplanted organs prior to engraftment as a method to reduce rejection, focusing on the CT matrix.

KEYWORDS:

carbohydrate; connective tissue; donor; glycosaminoglycans; rejection; transplant

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center