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Food Res Int. 2019 Jul;121:238-246. doi: 10.1016/j.foodres.2019.03.043. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Antihyperglycemic and hypoglycemic activity of naturally occurring peptides and protein hydrolysates from easy-to-cook and hard-to-cook beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

Author information

1
Universidade Federal de Goiás, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Laboratório de Química de Polímeros, CEP: 74009-970 Goiânia, GO, Brazil.
2
Universidade Federal de Goiás, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Laboratório de Química de Polímeros, CEP: 74009-970 Goiânia, GO, Brazil; Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Goiás, Campus Goiânia Oeste, CEP: 74270-040 Goiânia, GO, Brazil. Electronic address: karla.batista@ifg.edu.br.
3
Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Facultad de Medicina-UAEM, Leñeros S/N, 62350 Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico.
4
Universidade Federal de Goiás, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Laboratório de Química de Polímeros, CEP: 74009-970 Goiânia, GO, Brazil. Electronic address: katia@ufg.br.

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to examine the antidiabetic potential of naturally occurring peptides and hydrolysate fractions from easy-to-cook (ETC) and hard-to-cook (HTC) beans. All fractions were tested regarding their in vitro inhibitory activities against α-amylase and α-glucosidase as well as in vivo anti-hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic effects. Results evidenced that the peptide fractions with the lowest molecular weight (<3 kDa) have the highest inhibitory activities, and a 16.9%-89.1% inhibition of α-amylase and 34.4%-89.2% inhibition of α-glucosidase were observed. Regarding the antihyperglycemic activity, the fraction ETCNO3-10 showed a better performance than the positive control (acarbose). In addition, results from hypoglycemic activity evidenced that the tested peptide fractions were able to decrease the glucose levels at the same extension of glibenclamide, maintaining a constant basal glucose level without a postprandial hyperglycemia peak. Finally, it is possible to suggest that the naturally occurring peptides and hydrolysate fractions obtained from ETC and HTC common beans could be used in functional food production or pharmaceutical formulations to prevent diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Antidiabetic activity; Antihyperglycemic activity; Common bean; Hardening; Hypoglycemic activity; Type 2 diabetes mellitus; α-Glucosidase inhibition

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