Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ultrasound Med Biol. 2019 Aug;45(8):1918-1923. doi: 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2019.03.013. Epub 2019 May 17.

Quantification of Pediatric Burn Scar Stiffness Using Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Ultrasound Elastography.

Author information

1
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: andrea.doria@sickkids.ca.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to quantify the stiffness of hypertrophic scars using acoustic radiation force impulse ultrasound elastography. Sixteen pediatric patients with hypertrophic scars resulting from burn injuries participated in this study (mean age: 5.13, standard deviation: 3.20). Values for the elastic modulus (E) of scar and control sites were obtained. Scarred areas were found to be almost four times stiffer than control sites (scar Emean = 39.29 kPa compared with control Emean = 10.19 kPa) (p = 0.0004). Correlations between scar stiffness and clinician-reported subjective scar scale scores were not observed (rs = 0.30, p = 0.27 and rs = 0.25, p = 0.35 respectively). We found that acoustic radiation force impulse imaging can discriminate between hypertrophic scars and normal skin and should be considered a potentially valuable tool in the armamentarium of objective scar measures. Future research should focus on evaluating the technology's ability to detect scar change over time in order to determine responsiveness to treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Acoustic radiation force impulse elastography; Burn; Elastography; Hypertrophic scar; Imaging; Pediatric; Ultrasound

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center