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Pain Manag Nurs. 2019 May 15. pii: S1524-9042(17)30541-6. doi: 10.1016/j.pmn.2019.02.011. [Epub ahead of print]

Does Hand Massage Have Sustained Effects on Pain Intensity and Pain-Related Interference in the Cardiac Surgery Critically Ill? A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, 680 Sherbrooke West, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Electronic address: madalina.boitor@mail.mcgill.ca.
2
College of Nursing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.
3
Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University, 680 Sherbrooke West, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the promising short-term pain relief effect of massage, little is known regarding its sustained effects on pain intensity and pain-related interference with functioning.

AIMS:

To evaluate the sustained effect of hand massage on the pain intensity and pain-related interference with functioning of cardiac surgery patients.

DESIGN:

A randomized controlled trial.

SETTINGS:

A medical-surgical intensive care unit in Canada.

PARTICIPANTS/SUBJECTS:

Adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery and at low risk for postoperative complications were eligible.

METHODS:

In the intensive care unit, patients were randomly assigned to either 20-minute hand massage, hand holding, or rest. Pain intensity and pain-related interference with functioning were assessed on the second postoperative day.

RESULTS:

A total of 60 patients were randomly allocated and 46 completed data collection on the second postoperative day. Although no significant differences were identified across groups, the hand massage group reported a maximum pain intensity (median 5.75, range: 2-10) that was lower than the hand-holding (median 6.50, range: 1-10) and standard care groups (median 6.25, range: 0-10). The hand massage group could reach 0 pain intensity throughout a 24-hour period (median 0, range: 0-7), contrary to the hand-holding (median 2, range: 0-5) and standard care groups (median 2, range: 0-4.5). A trend for statistical significance was noted for dichotomized ratings on pain interference with walking (p = .176) and sleep (p = .050).

CONCLUSIONS:

Hand massage could help patients experience longer periods without pain and lower levels of maximum pain intensity. When coupled with recovery activities, hand massage could reduce pain-related interference with functioning.

PMID:
31103505
DOI:
10.1016/j.pmn.2019.02.011

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