Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Exp Metastasis. 2019 May 17. doi: 10.1007/s10585-019-09972-3. [Epub ahead of print]

The importance of developing therapies targeting the biological spectrum of metastatic disease.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA.
2
Program of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA.
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
4
Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA.
5
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, Medfort, MA, USA.
6
Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA.
7
The Francis Crick Institute, 1 Midland Road, London, NW1 1AT, UK.
8
Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine, 13125, Berlin, Germany.
9
German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
10
Garvan Institute of Medical Research & The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia.
11
St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2010, Australia.
12
Institute for Health and Sport, Victoria University, Melbourne, VIC, 3011, Australia.
13
Australian Institute for Musculoskeletal Science (AIMSS), Department of Medicine Western Health, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, 3010, Australia.
14
Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia.
15
Department of Oral Function & Molecular Biology, Ohu University School of Dentistry, 31-1 Misumido, Tomita-machi, Koriyama, 963-8611, Japan.
16
Department of Oncological Sciences and Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
17
Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Tisch Cancer Institute, Black Family Stem Cell Institute, Precision Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. julio.aguirre-ghiso@mssm.edu.

Abstract

Great progress has been made in cancer therapeutics. However, metastasis remains the predominant cause of death from cancer. Importantly, metastasis can manifest many years after initial treatment of the primary cancer. This is because cancer cells can remain dormant before forming symptomatic metastasis. An important question is whether metastasis research should focus on the early treatment of metastases, before they are clinically evident ("overt"), or on developing treatments to stop overt metastasis (stage IV cancer). In this commentary we want to clarify why it is important that all avenues of treatment for stage IV patients are developed. Indeed, future treatments are expected to go beyond the mere shrinkage of overt metastases and will include strategies that prevent disseminated tumor cells from emerging from dormancy.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer dormancy; Liquid biopsy; Metastasis; Minimal residual disease; Stage IV cancer

PMID:
31102066
DOI:
10.1007/s10585-019-09972-3

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center