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Int J Paediatr Dent. 2019 May;29(3):238-248. doi: 10.1111/ipd.12484.

Early childhood caries epidemiology, aetiology, risk assessment, societal burden, management, education, and policy: Global perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry, University of Maryland, School of Dentistry, Baltimore, Maryland.
2
Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas.
3
Department of Developmental Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas.
4
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Lutheran University of Brazil, School of Dentistry, Canoas, Brazil.
5
Dental Public Health, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
6
Faculty of Dentistry, Thammasat University, Patumthani, Thailand.
7
Faculty of Dentistry, Oral & Craniofacial Sciences, Centre for Dental Innovation and Impact, Kings College London, London, UK.
8
School of Dentistry, University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
9
Department of Paediatric Dental Medicine, Faculty of Dental Medicine, Medical University, Sofia, Bulgaria.
10
Department of Family and Community Oral Health, Institute of Dentistry, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.
11
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This paper is a summary of the proceedings of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry Bangkok Conference on early childhood caries (ECC) held in 3-4 November 2018.

AIM:

The paper aims to convey a global perspective of ECC definitions, aetiology, risk factors, societal costs, management, educational curriculum, and policy.

DESIGN:

This global perspective on ECC is the compilation of the state of science, current concepts, and literature regarding ECC from worldwide experts on ECC.

RESULTS:

Early childhood caries is related to frequent sugar consumption in an environment of enamel adherent, acid-producing bacteria in a complex biofilm, as well as developmental defects of enamel. The seriousness, societal costs, and impact on quality of life of dental caries in pre-school children are enormous. Worldwide data show that ECC continues to be highly prevalent, yet infrequently treated. Approaches to reduce the prevalence include interventions that start in the first year of a child's life, evidence-based and risk-based management, and reimbursement systems that foster preventive care.

CONCLUSIONS:

This global perspective on ECC epidemiology, aetiology, risk assessment, global impact, and management is aimed to foster improved worldwide understanding and management of ECC.

KEYWORDS:

aetiology; early childhood caries; epidemiology; management; policy

PMID:
31099128
DOI:
10.1111/ipd.12484
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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