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J Psychiatr Res. 2019 Jul;114:170-177. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.04.023. Epub 2019 Apr 28.

Development of VM-REACT: Verbal memory RecAll computerized test.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94304, USA; Sierra Pacific Mental Illness, Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Healthcare System, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94304, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94304, USA; Sierra Pacific Mental Illness, Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC), Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Healthcare System, Palo Alto, CA, 94304, USA. Electronic address: amitetkin@stanford.edu.

Abstract

When tracking the progression of neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases, assessment tools that enable repeated measures of cognition and require little examiner burden are increasingly important to develop. In the current study, we describe the development of the VM-REACT (Verbal Memory REcAll Computerized Test), which assesses verbal memory recall abilities using a computerized, automated version. Four different list versions of the test were applied on a cohort of 798 healthy adults (ages 20-80). Recall and learning scores were computed and compared to existing gender- and age-matched published norms for a similar paper-and-pencil test. Performance was similar to existing age-matched norms for all but the two oldest age groups. These adults (ages 60-80) outperformed their age-matched norms. Processing speed, initiation speed, and number of recall errors are also reported for each age group. Our findings suggest that VM-REACT can be utilized to study verbal memory abilities in a standardized and time efficient manner, and thus holds great promise for assessment in the 21st century.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Computerized tests; Neuropsychological assessments; Verbal memory

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