Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Proteome Res. 2019 Jun 7;18(6):2666-2675. doi: 10.1021/acs.jproteome.9b00173. Epub 2019 May 29.

Therapy-Induced MHC I Ligands Shape Neo-Antitumor CD8 T Cell Responses during Oncolytic Virus-Based Cancer Immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, Interfaculty Institute for Cell Biology , University of Tübingen , 72074 Tübingen , Germany.
2
Immatics Biotechnologies GmbH , 72076 Tübingen , Germany.
3
Department of Cell Biology , Harvard Medical School , Boston , Massachusetts 02115 , United States.

Abstract

Oncolytic viruses (OVs), known for their cancer-killing characteristics, also overturn tumor-associated defects in antigen presentation through the MHC class I pathway and induce protective neo-antitumor CD8 T cell responses. Nonetheless, whether OVs shape the tumor MHC-I ligandome remains unknown. Here, we investigated if an OV induces the presentation of novel MHC I-bound tumor antigens (termed tumor MHC-I ligands). Using comparative mass spectrometry (MS)-based MHC-I ligandomics, we determined differential tumor MHC-I ligand expression following treatment with oncolytic reovirus in a murine ovarian cancer model. In vitro, we found that reovirus changes the tumor ligandome of cancer cells. Concurrent multiplexed quantitative proteomics revealed that the reovirus-induced changes in tumor MHC-I ligand presentation were mostly independent of their source proteins. In an in vivo model, tumor MHC-I ligands induced by reovirus were detectable not only in tumor tissues but also the spleens (a source of antigen-presenting cells) of tumor-bearing mice. Most importantly, therapy-induced MHC-I ligands stimulated antigen-specific IFNγ responses in antitumor CD8 T cells from mice treated with reovirus. These data show that therapy-induced MHC-I ligands may shape underlying neo-antitumor CD8 T cell responses. As such, they should be considered in strategies promoting the efficacy of OV-based cancer immunotherapies.

KEYWORDS:

CD8 T cell epitopes; MHC ligandome; antitumor immunity; cancer immunotherapy; mass spectrometry; oncolytic virus; reovirus

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Chemical Society
Loading ...
Support Center