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Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2019 May 16:1359104519846582. doi: 10.1177/1359104519846582. [Epub ahead of print]

Using the K-SADS psychosis screen to identify people with early psychosis or psychosis risk syndromes.

Author information

1
1 University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA.
2
2 School of Medicine, University of Maryland, USA.
3
3 VA Capitol Health Care Network (VISN 5), USA.
4
4 School of Nursing, University of Maryland, USA.
5
5 Brown University, USA.
6
6 University of Minnesota, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Current methods to identify people with psychosis risk involve administration of specialized tools such as the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS), but these methods have not been widely adopted. Validation of a more multipurpose assessment tool-such as the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS)-may increase the scope of identification efforts.

METHODS:

We assessed the correspondence between SIPS-determined clinical high risk/early psychosis (CHR/early psychosis) status and K-SADS psychosis screen (child and parent reports and their combination) in a sample of 147 help-seeking individuals aged 12-25. Detailed classification results are reported.

RESULTS:

Both the child and parent interviews on the K-SADS psychosis screen were strongly predictive of CHR/early psychosis status, although parent reports contributed no significant additional information beyond child reports. Across informants, the presence of either subthreshold hallucinations or subthreshold delusions was highly suggestive of CHR/early psychosis status as determined by SIPS interview (78% (child) and 74% (parent) accuracy).

CONCLUSIONS:

Subthreshold scores on the two-item K-SADS psychosis screen may be good indicators of the presence or absence of early signs of psychosis. The option of using a non-specialized assessment such as the K-SADS as a staged approach to assess for CHR/early psychosis status could increase rates of early psychosis screening and treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical high-risk; early psychosis; psychosis; schizophrenia; ultrahigh risk

PMID:
31094226
DOI:
10.1177/1359104519846582

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