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Eat Weight Disord. 2019 May 15. doi: 10.1007/s40519-019-00707-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Seasonal fluctuations in weight and self-weighing behavior among adults in a behavioral weight loss intervention.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, The University of Memphis, 400 Innovation Drive, Memphis, TN, 38111, USA. mcfahey@memphis.edu.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 66 N Pauline Street, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA.
3
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Virginia, 1215 Lee Street, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The current study aimed to observe potential seasonal fluctuations in weight and self-weighing behavior among a diverse sample of adults engaged in a behavioral weight loss intervention.

METHODS:

Active duty personnel (N = 248) were randomized to either a counselor-initiated or self-paced 12-month behavioral weight loss intervention promoting daily self-weighing. Body weight and self-weighing frequency were collected from electronic scales (e-scales) provided at baseline.

RESULTS:

Overall, participants lost weight from winter to spring (p = 0.02) and gained weight from fall to winter (p < 0.001). No demographic differences in weight changes were observed. Participants self-weighed less frequently during summer compared to spring (p < 0.0001), less in fall compared to summer (p < 0.0001), and less in winter compared to fall (p < 0.0001). In multivariate models, weight change and self-weighing frequency during the previous season, as well as days since randomization and intervention intensity were associated with seasonal weight changes.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study is the first to observe seasonal fluctuations of weight and self-weighing behavior among adults actively engaged in a weight loss intervention, consistent with research in the general population. Findings highlight the importance of acknowledging seasonal influence within weight loss programs and trials.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Level I, randomized controlled trial.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral weight loss intervention; Seasonal weight patterns; Self-weighing

PMID:
31093925
PMCID:
PMC6856417
[Available on 2020-11-15]
DOI:
10.1007/s40519-019-00707-7

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