Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2019 May 15;10(1):2165. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-10196-y.

Declines in mental health associated with air pollution and temperature variability in China.

Author information

1
BIC-ESAT and SKL-ESPC, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China.
2
BIC-ESAT and SKL-ESPC, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China. tzhu@pku.edu.cn.
3
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modeling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, China.

Abstract

Mental disorders have been associated with various aspects of anthropogenic change to the environment, but the relative effects of different drivers are uncertain. Here we estimate associations between multiple environmental factors (air quality, residential greenness, mean temperature, and temperature variability) and self-assessed mental health scores for over 20,000 Chinese residents. Mental health scores were surveyed in 2010 and 2014, allowing us to link changes in mental health to the changes in environmental variables. Increases in air pollution and temperature variability are associated with higher probabilities of declined mental health. Mental health is statistically unrelated to mean temperature in this study, and the effect of greenness on mental health depends on model settings, suggesting a need for further study. Our findings suggest that the environmental policies to reduce emissions of air pollution or greenhouse gases can improve mental health of the public in China.

PMID:
31092825
PMCID:
PMC6520357
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-10196-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center