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Int J Mol Sci. 2019 May 14;20(10). pii: E2372. doi: 10.3390/ijms20102372.

A PTPmu Biomarker is Associated with Increased Survival in Gliomas.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106-4960, USA. mette.johansen@case.edu.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106-4960, USA. jason.vincent@case.edu.
3
Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. haley.gittleman@case.edu.
4
Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106-4960, USA. sonya.ensslen@case.edu.
5
Department of Neurological Surgery, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Seidman Cancer Center and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. marta.couce@uhhospitals.org.
6
Department of Neurological Surgery, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Seidman Cancer Center and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. andrew.sloan@uhhospitals.org.
7
Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. jill.barnholtz-sloan@case.edu.
8
Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106-4960, USA. susann.brady-kalnay@case.edu.
9
Department of Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA. susann.brady-kalnay@case.edu.

Abstract

An integrated approach has been adopted by the World Health Organization (WHO) for diagnosing brain tumors. This approach relies on the molecular characterization of biopsied tissue in conjunction with standard histology. Diffuse gliomas (grade II to grade IV malignant brain tumors) have a wide range in overall survival, from months for the worst cases of glioblastoma (GBM) to years for lower grade astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors. We previously identified a change in the cell adhesion molecule PTPmu in brain tumors that results in the generation of proteolytic fragments. We developed agents to detect this cell surface-associated biomarker of the tumor microenvironment. In the current study, we evaluated the PTPmu biomarker in tissue microarrays and individual tumor samples of adolescent and young adult (n = 25) and adult (n = 69) glioma populations using a fluorescent histochemical reagent, SBK4-TR, that recognizes the PTPmu biomarker. We correlated staining with clinical data and found that high levels of the PTPmu biomarker correlate with increased survival of glioma patients, including those with GBM. Patients with high PTPmu live for 48 months on average, whereas PTPmu low patients live only 22 months. PTPmu high staining indicates a doubling of patient survival. Use of the agent to detect the PTPmu biomarker would allow differentiation of glioma patients with distinct survival outcomes and would complement current molecular approaches used in glioma prognosis.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent and young adult; biomarker; glioblastoma; glioma; molecular analysis of glioma; receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPmu

PMID:
31091655
PMCID:
PMC6566278
DOI:
10.3390/ijms20102372
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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