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Bone Marrow Transplant. 2019 Nov;54(11):1827-1835. doi: 10.1038/s41409-019-0535-z. Epub 2019 May 14.

Psychophysical effects of an exercise therapy during pediatric stem cell transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Hemostaseology, Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt am Main, Germany. anna.senn-malashonak@kgu.de.
2
Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Hemostaseology, Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
3
Department of Sports Medicine, Institute of Sports Sciences, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
4
Department of Oncology and Hematology, Krankenhaus Nordwest, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
5
Department for Stem Cell Transplantation and Immunology, Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract

This study evaluates the physical and psychosocial effects of an inpatient exercise program for children and adolescents undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Participants (n = 70) were randomized to an exercise intervention (IG: resistance, endurance, and flexibility training) or a non-exercise control group (CG: mental and relaxation training). Pre- (prior hospital admission; T0) and post- (day of discharge; T1) measurements included maximal isometric knee extension strength (KES; strain gauge force transducer), hand grip strength (HGS; JAMAR dynamometer), distance walked in 6 min (6MWD; 6-minute walk test), quality of life (QoL; KINDL-R) and medical parameters. Fifty-seven patients (IG: n = 28; 11.0 (5-17) years; CG: n = 29; 12.0 (6-18) years) completed the study. During hospitalization the IG and CG attended on average 3.1 (2-4) or 2.9 (0.3-4) training sessions weekly. KES, 6MWD, and HGS significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the CG, while there were no changes in the IG. Pre- to post-changes in 6MWD and HGS differed significantly between groups (p < 0.05). QoL declined in both groups (p < 0.05). Our results indicate that a moderate exercise program is feasible and might counteract a treatment-associated decline of physical performance.

PMID:
31089282
DOI:
10.1038/s41409-019-0535-z

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