Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Urol Focus. 2019 May 10. pii: S2405-4569(19)30137-3. doi: 10.1016/j.euf.2019.05.002. [Epub ahead of print]

Fluid Intake and Dietary Factors and the Risk of Incident Kidney Stones in UK Biobank: A Population-based Prospective Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: Thomas.littlejohns@ndph.ox.ac.uk.
2
Oxford Stone Group, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: naomi.neal@ouh.nhs.uk.
3
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; National Institute for Health Innovation, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
4
Department of Urology and Paediatric Urology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
5
Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
6
Oxford Stone Group, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fluid intake and diet are thought to influence kidney stone risk. However, prospective studies have been limited to small samples sizes and/or restricted measures.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether fluid intake and dietary factors are associated with the risk of developing a first kidney stone.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were selected from UK Biobank, a population-based prospective cohort study.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between fluid intake and dietary factors and the risk of a first incident kidney stone, ascertained from hospital inpatient records.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

After exclusion, 439 072 participants were available for the analysis, of whom 2057 had hospital admission with an incident kidney stone over a mean of 6.1 yr of follow-up. For every additional drink (200 ml) consumed per day of total fluid, the risk of kidney stones declined by 13% (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-0.89). Similar patterns of associations were observed for tea, coffee, and alcohol, although no association was observed for water intake. Fruit and fibre intake was also associated with a lower risk (HR per 100 g increase of fruits per day = 0.88, 95% CI 0.83-0.93, and HR per 10 g fibre per day = 0.82, 95% CI 0.77-0.87), whereas meat and salt intake was associated with a higher risk (HR per 50 g increase in meat per week = 1.17, 95% CI 1.05-1.29, and HR for always vs never/rarely added salt to food = 1.33, 95% CI 1.12-1.58). Vegetable, fish, and cheese intake was not associated with kidney stone risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

The finding that high intake of total fluid, fruit, and fibre was associated with a lower risk of hospitalisation for a first kidney stone suggests that modifiable dietary factors could be targeted to prevent kidney stone development.

PATIENT SUMMARY:

We found that higher intake of total fluid, specifically tea, coffee, and alcohol (but not water), and consumption of fruit and foods high in fibre are linked with a reduced likelihood of developing kidney stones.

KEYWORDS:

Diet; Fluid; Kidney stones; Longitudinal; UK Biobank

PMID:
31085062
DOI:
10.1016/j.euf.2019.05.002
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center