Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychol Med. 2019 May 14:1-12. doi: 10.1017/S003329171900093X. [Epub ahead of print]

Interactive impact of childhood maltreatment, depression, and age on cortical brain structure: mega-analytic findings from a large multi-site cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,Otto von Guericke University,Magdeburg,Germany.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,University Medicine Greifswald,Greifswald,Germany.
3
SAMRC Unit on Risk & Resilience in Mental Disorders, UCT Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health,Cape Town,South Africa.
4
Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney,Camperdown,Australia.
5
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience,Trinity College Dublin,Ireland.
6
Division of Mind and Brain Research, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy CCM,Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health,Berlin,Germany.
7
Institute for Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medicine Greifswald,Germany.
8
Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, and Center of Cardiovascular Research (DZHK),Germany,partner site Greifswald.
9
Department of General Psychiatry,University Hospital Heidelberg,Germany.
10
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,University of Bonn, Germany, and Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,Vitos Weil-Lahn, Hesse,Germany.
11
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,University of Münster,Germany.
12
Institute of Clinical Radiology, University of Münster,Germany.
13
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,Medical Center, University of Freiburg,Germany.
14
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,Agaplesion Diakoniklinikum,Rotenburg,Germany.
15
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,Philipps-University Marburg,Germany.
16
Center for Integrative Psychiatry,University of Lübeck,Lübeck,Germany.
17
School of Psychology, College of Applied Health and Communities, University of East London,London,UK.
18
Department of Psychology,School of Arts and Social Sciences, City,University of London,London,UK.
19
Department of Psychiatry & Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute,UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California,San Francisco,USA.
20
Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology,Magdeburg,Germany.
21
Imaging Genetics Center, Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine of University of California,Marina del Rey, CA,USA.
22
VA San Diego Healthcare,San Francisco, CA,USA.
23
Clinical Translational Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior,University of California,Irvine, CA,USA.
24
Department of Psychiatry,Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, Leiden University Medical Center,Leiden,The Netherlands.
25
Department of Biomedical Sciences of Cells and Systems,Cognitive Neuroscience Center, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen,Groningen,The Netherlands.
26
Department of Psychiatry and Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam,VU University Medical Center,Amsterdam,The Netherlands.
27
Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health,Melbourne,Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Childhood maltreatment (CM) plays an important role in the development of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to examine whether CM severity and type are associated with MDD-related brain alterations, and how they interact with sex and age.

METHODS:

Within the ENIGMA-MDD network, severity and subtypes of CM using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire were assessed and structural magnetic resonance imaging data from patients with MDD and healthy controls were analyzed in a mega-analysis comprising a total of 3872 participants aged between 13 and 89 years. Cortical thickness and surface area were extracted at each site using FreeSurfer.

RESULTS:

CM severity was associated with reduced cortical thickness in the banks of the superior temporal sulcus and supramarginal gyrus as well as with reduced surface area of the middle temporal lobe. Participants reporting both childhood neglect and abuse had a lower cortical thickness in the inferior parietal lobe, middle temporal lobe, and precuneus compared to participants not exposed to CM. In males only, regardless of diagnosis, CM severity was associated with higher cortical thickness of the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, a significant interaction between CM and age in predicting thickness was seen across several prefrontal, temporal, and temporo-parietal regions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Severity and type of CM may impact cortical thickness and surface area. Importantly, CM may influence age-dependent brain maturation, particularly in regions related to the default mode network, perception, and theory of mind.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood maltreatment; ENIGMA; cortical thickness; major depressive disorder

PMID:
31084657
DOI:
10.1017/S003329171900093X

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center