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Bipolar Disord. 2019 May 13. doi: 10.1111/bdi.12796. [Epub ahead of print]

Is smartphone-based mood instability associated with stress, quality of life and functioning in bipolar disorder?

Author information

1
Copenhagen Affective Disorder Research Center (CADIC), Psychiatric Center Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
Monsenso Aps, Torveporten 2, 2500, Valby.
3
Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Mood instability in patients with bipolar disorder has been associated with impaired functioning and risk of relapse. The present study aimed to investigate whether increased mood instability is associated with increased perceived stress and impaired quality of life and functioning in patients with bipolar disorder.

METHODS:

A total of 84 patients with bipolar disorder used a smartphone-based self-monitoring system on a daily basis for nine months. Data on perceived stress, quality of life and clinically rated functioning were collected at five fixed time points for each patient during follow-up. A group of 37 healthy individuals served as a control comparison of perceived stress, quality of life and psychosocial functioning.

RESULTS:

The majority of patients presented in full or partial remission. As hypothesized, mood instability was significantly associated with increased perceived stress (B: 10.52, 95% CI: 5.25; 15.77, p<0.0001) and decreased quality of life (B: -12.17, 95% CI. -19.54; -4.79, p<0.0001) and functioning (B: -12.04, 95% CI: -19.08; -4.99, p<0.0001) in patients with bipolar disorder. There were no differences in mood instability according to prescribed psychopharmacological treatment. Compared with healthy individuals, patients reported substantially increased perceived stress and experienced decreased quality of life and decreased functioning based on researcher-blinded evaluation.

CONCLUSION:

Mood instability in bipolar disorder is associated with increased perceived stress and decreased quality of life and functioning even during full or partial remission. There is a need to monitor and identify subsyndromal inter-episodic symptoms. Future studies investigating the effect of treatment on mood instability are highly warranted. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Mood instability; Smartphone

PMID:
31081991
DOI:
10.1111/bdi.12796

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