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Environ Int. 2019 Jul;128:399-406. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.04.061. Epub 2019 May 9.

Does nano silver promote the selection of antibiotic resistance genes in soil and plant?

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021, China; Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia.
2
Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China.
4
Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021, China; State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China; College of Advanced Agricultural Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049, China.
5
Key Laboratory of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021, China. Electronic address: lcui@iue.ac.cn.

Abstract

Growing evidences have demonstrated that heavy metal contamination can promote the proliferation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) via co-selection. However, effects of nano-metal-materials on the occurrence and level of ARGs in the soil and plant, have not been fully explored. To gain insights into this impact, we conducted a pot experiment by adding nano‑silver particles (AgNPs) as a stimuli and Ag ion (AgNO3) and tetracycline as a comparison. By using high throughput quantitative PCR, our results indicated that application of AgNPs (~20 nm and ~50 nm) at a concentration of 100 ppm resulted in no significant changes in the abundance of ARGs in either soil or phyllosphere (P > 0.05). Nevertheless, the overall pattern of resistome, especially in soil, was shifted following AgNPs application, with a significance increase in the relative abundance of efflux pumps genes, which is an important mechanism for co-selection of ARGs by heavy metals. By comparison, Ag ion at an equivalent Ag mass of AgNPs markedly increased ARGs abundance and shifted ARGs profile in soil, indicating that free Ag ion had a stronger impact on ARGs than AgNPs. These findings provide new insights in assessing the risks of manufactured nanomaterials accumulated in the environment.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic resistance; Co-selection; Nano-materials; Plant microbiome; Silver nanoparticles

PMID:
31078874
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2019.04.061
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