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J Pharm Biomed Anal. 2019 Aug 5;172:268-277. doi: 10.1016/j.jpba.2019.05.007. Epub 2019 May 4.

A systematic investigation on free phenolic acids and flavonoids profiles of commonly consumed edible flowers in China.

Author information

1
Food Science and Technology Program, Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College, Zhuhai, Guangdong, 519085, China; Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H9X3V9, Canada.
2
Food Science and Technology Program, Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College, Zhuhai, Guangdong, 519085, China.
3
Food Science and Technology Program, Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College, Zhuhai, Guangdong, 519085, China. Electronic address: baojunxu@uic.edu.hk.

Abstract

Edible flowers of ornamental plants are non-toxic flowers that have been used since ancient times for their nutritional and health benefits. These health benefits are attributed to their phytochemicals such as phenolic acids and flavonoids. These phytochemicals exert positive health effects on chronic diseases such as cancer, inflammation, and diabetes. This research paper is focused on the systematic investigation of free phenolic acids and flavonoids (including anthocyanins) present in 70 commonly consumed edible flowers collected from local parks and Qingping market of Guangzhou, China. The phenolic acids and flavonoids of flower samples were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector. The phenolic acids, flavones, flavonols, flavanones, and anthocyanins of different flower samples exhibit a wide range of variation. Gallic acid (1177.8-27717.2 μg/g), protocatechuic acid (66.7-9641.2 μg/g), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (43.6-1792.7 μg/g), quercitrin and hesperidin (49.9-14576.6 μg/g), and quercetin and luteolin (8.8-480.0 μg/g) were the predominant phenolic compounds in edible flowers samples under investigation. Anthocyanins were detected only in 14 kinds of flower samples and most of these flowers were of red or purple colour.

KEYWORDS:

Anthocyanins; Bioactive compounds; Edible flowers; Flavonoids; Phenolic acids

PMID:
31078063
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpba.2019.05.007

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