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Chemosphere. 2019 Aug;229:94-102. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.05.020. Epub 2019 May 4.

Chlorpyrifos-induced reproductive toxicity in rats could be partly relieved under high-fat diet.

Author information

1
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China.
2
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Chinese Academy of Inspection and Quarantine, Beijing, 100176, China.
3
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Key Laboratory of Functional Dairy, Co-constructed by Ministry of Education and Beijing Government, and Beijing Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China.
4
Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China. Electronic address: bingfang@cau.edu.cn.

Abstract

The widely used pesticide, chlorpyrifos, was found to inhibit the secretion of sex hormones and decrease the count and quality of sperm. A high-fat diet damaged the reproductive system by inducing oxidative damage and interfering with hormone synthesis, indicating the possibility of diet-specific effects of chlorpyrifos on reproductive toxicity. Several studies have demonstrated diet-specific toxicity of pesticides in the central nervous system, metabolism and gut microbiome, but the effect of a high-fat diet on the reproductive toxicity of chlorpyrifos has not been studied. In this study, rats were fed a normal-fat or high-fat diet and exposed to 3.0 mg chlorpyrifos/kg body weight by gavage for 20 weeks. Chlorpyrifos changed the sperm, serum hormones, oxidative stress in the testis, and enzyme activity related to spermatogenesis in rat testes when comparing the different diets. Chlorpyrifos significantly decreased total sperm count, serum testosterone and gonadotropin levels and the activity of enzymes involved in spermatogenesis, as well as lead to oxidative damage in the testis. It was interesting that a high-fat diet relieved all these effects, and chlorpyrifos only exhibited obvious reproductive toxicity in the normal-fat condition. It was necessary to consider the effect of dietary fats when evaluating pesticide toxicity.

KEYWORDS:

Chlorpyrifos; Dietary fat; Sperm; Spermatogenesis; Testis; Testosterone

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