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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019 Sep 30;180:114-122. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.05.005. Epub 2019 May 8.

Factors that affect the occurrence and distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in soils from livestock and poultry farms.

Author information

1
College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China; State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-hydraulic Engineering in Arid Area, Xi'an University of Technology, Xi'an 710048, China.
2
College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China. Electronic address: gujie205@sina.com.
3
College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China.
4
College of Natural Resources and Environment, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China; Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi'an 710075, China.
5
State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-hydraulic Engineering in Arid Area, Xi'an University of Technology, Xi'an 710048, China.

Abstract

Livestock manure is generally dumped directly onto open soil or used to enhance the soil fertility. However, there are growing concerns regarding the impact of these practices on the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil. In this study, we sampled soils treated with manure from 10 large-scale farms (pig, beef cattle, and chicken farms) and those from farmland without manure. The results showed that the abundance of ARGs was more than 2.62 times higher in the soil samples treated with livestock manure than the farmland soil without manure. The abundances of ARGs and intI1 in all samples were in the following order: pig farms > chicken farms > beef cattle farms. tetX, sul1, sul2, and tetG were the dominant ARGs in farm soil. The concentrations of tetracycline antibiotics and sulfonamide antibiotics were 0.15-4.76 mg/kg and 0-2.62 mg/kg, respectively, in the soils treated with manure, which were higher than those in farmland soils without manure. Redundancy analysis (P < 0.05) and network analysis (P < 0.01, R > 0.80) demonstrated that copper, zinc, actinomycetes, and tetracycline antibiotics were the main factors that affected the distribution of ARGs in soils treated with livestock manure.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic; Heavy metal; Microbial community; Quantitative PCR; Tetracycline resistance gene

PMID:
31078018
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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