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Epilepsy Behav. 2019 Jul;96:57-60. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2019.04.017. Epub 2019 May 9.

Quality of life improves with integrated behavioral health services in pediatric new-onset epilepsy.

Author information

1
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Center for the Promotion of Adherence and Self-Management, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Electronic address: shanna.guilfoyle@cchmc.org.
2
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Center for the Promotion of Adherence and Self-Management, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.
3
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Center for the Promotion of Adherence and Self-Management, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.

Abstract

The current study compared differences in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between youth with new-onset epilepsy with and without elevated psychological symptoms at time of epilepsy diagnosis within an integrated behavioral health and epilepsy service. Patients received both behavioral health and epilepsy care during clinic visits. A retrospective chart review was conducted between July 2011 and December 2015. Caregivers completed the Behavior Assessment System for Children-2: Parent Rating Scale (BASC-2: PRS) to assess psychological symptoms at the diagnostic visit, along with completing the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™ 4.0) at the diagnostic visit and each subsequent epilepsy clinic visit during the first year of treatment. Latent growth curve modeling was used to identify HRQOL changes over the first year of treatment. Health-related quality of life was significantly lower for youth with elevated psychological symptoms at diagnosis and over the first year of treatment compared with those without psychological symptoms. For those with elevated internalizing, inattention, withdrawal, and atypical symptoms at diagnosis, greater HRQOL improvements were detected over the first year of treatment compared with those without elevated psychological symptoms at the diagnostic visit. Within integrated behavioral health and epilepsy routine care, targeted psychological interventions can improve HRQOL over the first year of treatment, particularly for those with premorbid psychological symptoms.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral health services; Pediatric epilepsy; Quality of life

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